Five of the Best Jobs For Anxiety Sufferers

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Anxiety disorders affect different people in many different ways, and sometimes finding gainful employment can be made more difficult due to the sufferer’s needs.

Some need quiet environments, while others can work with people but only in small doses. Some who cope with social anxiety disorders find they need to get out and avoid isolation, while others find it’s best for them to keep interaction at a bare minimum. While there is no one right answer for everyone, there are several jobs that can offer flexibility for sufferers depending on their needs/diagnosis.

Whether you’re looking for something that will allow you to work one-on-one with someone or just a freelance job that can be done from your computer, there are many options if you know where to look. Here are a handful of the best jobs to think about if you struggle with anxiety.

Give Back As a Nurse/Nurse’s Aide

Many colleges offer nursing courses that can be partially completed online (there are labs that can be done at the school), and there is always a need for nurses who can work varying shifts. If full-time nursing isn’t for you, there may be a hospital, hospice, or retirement home looking for an aide. These jobs are mostly quiet, can be done at any time of day, and allow for very little interaction with others in many cases.

Get Outside As a Dog Walker

man and dog happy in the sun takign a selfieDog walking jobs can offer flexibility for even the fullest schedule, depending on what the pet owner’s needs are. With sites like Rover.com, you can pair up with someone nearby who needs a responsible caregiver for their dog during the day, and the site will even take care of the financial end of the deal for you. Working with animals can be extremely rewarding and soothing, especially when it’s a non-threatening dog, and taking care of a pet offers a bonding experience like no other. If you do have a little more time to spend with your furry client, you can also sign up to be a pet sitter.

Look Into Merchandising

Working for companies that need a merchandiser can be lucrative and offer quite a bit of flexibility while giving you the option to work mostly alone or with a small team. Greeting card businesses, liquor distributors, and retailers are all examples of companies that need responsible, self-motivated employees to build displays and maintain items in various stores. With many of these jobs, you may be able to set your own hours or find a good niche that works for you, and a lot of them require little interaction with others.

Use Your Writing Skills & Work From Home

While working from home is considered the ultimate dream job for many, it’s not always easy to find a gig that pays well. creating schedules to relieve anxietyWriting freelance articles, however, can be a good way to go if you’re skilled and know where to look. Check out your favorite blogs and sites for contributor information. If they accept your article pitch, you can make around $25 per piece. It’s also a good idea to sign up for email newsletters from places like FreedomWithWriting.com, which will send you publishers, sites, and magazines that are looking for short stories and articles.

Work “Back of the House” in Food Service

Many restaurants — including those inside hotels and stores — need line cooks and employees to come in early to complete prep work, which can be anything from setting up a salad bar to chopping up vegetables and fruit. These jobs are usually done behind the scenes and allow you to work either alone or with a small group of people, away from the public. They are also pretty flexible, depending on what your schedule may be, as restaurants are open at various hours throughout the day and evening (some even operate overnight).

Working with social anxiety can be trying at times, but depending on your diagnosis and treatment, there are several options that offer flexible schedules and varying levels of interaction. Living with social anxiety disorder doesn’t have to mean total isolation from others.

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Jennifer McGregor is a pre-med student, who loves providing reliable health and medical resources for The Public Health Library users. She knows how difficult it can be to sift through the mountains of health-related information on the web. She co-created the site with a friend as a way to push reputable information on health topics to the forefront, making them easier and quicker to find.

 

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